Queen Sugar: No Longer Imagine

 

When Charley confronts Nova about Blessings and Blood, she reads a book excerpt which states, “My sister, born to privilege, raised in wealth and half-bathed in whiteness used her light skin as her shield and her sword. Weapons in every room she entered, in every deal she made, in every woman she sacrificed and for every man she protected. Her honey skin kept her safe. All the while keeping her complicit in the continued oppression of black bodies.”

This statement confirms my theory since season 1. Nova hates her sister and is jealous of Charley’s light-skinned privilege. During season 1, Nova said, “Charley has had sugar coated on top of shit her whole life.” How would you know, Nova? It is likely Nova  carried deep resentment for Charley since childhood. Oddly enough, it makes sense. Her sister is a constant reminder of Ernest leaving True and Nova for Lorna, Charley’s mother.

I will take a moment to empathize with the broken little girl in Nova Bordelon. I could not imagine watching my Dad leave my mother and I to start another family.  I could only imagine how incredibly painful, confusing and angering it was for a little girl to experience this. Consequently, Nova felt abandoned and neglected by Ernest.

However, Charley is not her pain. Charley can not help how she came into the world. Nova Bordelon made assumptions Charley lived a wealthy, privileged life as a half-black woman. I believe Nova thought about Charley’s clothes, boarding school, expensive lifestyle, the prestigious universities she attended, and assumed it was handed to her. In Nova’s mind, Charley got the better end of the stick.

I understand why a child would make those assumptions. When I was a teenager, I was jealous of a friend. Everybody liked her because of her bubbly and kind personality. Numerous boys vied for her affection in grade school. One of those boys talked to me and then tried to date my friend. She was pretty, light-skinned, curvy and had rich parents.  I thought she had the dream life.

I was brown-skinned, not curvaceous and from a middle class family. I never felt accepted by other kids. I wanted boys to find me attractive. I wanted to have tons of friends. Honestly, I sought self-acceptance and self-love in the wrong ways. Yet, I took my self-hatred out on my friend.

As an adult, I realized my wrongdoings, took accountability for my actions and took steps to love myself versus comparing myself to others. However, Nova’s brokenness does not excuse her constant disrespect towards the Bordelon clan. In Blessings and Blood, Nova claims Charley promotes rape culture by sacrificing women. This implies Charley lacks respect for women. But what about Nova’s lack of respect for women?

curls-understood-celebs-with-naturally-curly-hair-Queen-Sugar-Calvin-Greg-Vaughan-and-Nova-Bordelon-played-Rutina-Wesley

She continued her relationship with Calvin, a married man and father of two. She took $10,000 out of her siblings’ joint business account, an account created solely for business purposes such as agricultural tools needed for the sugar cane. In addition, Charley carried the financial responsibility of the account. Though the funds were used to pay the bail of Too Sweet, a young man abused in prison for a small possession of marijuana, Nova did not ask permission. When Charley confronted Nova, she became defensive and attacked Charley for her decision to pay a settlement to Davis’s mistress. She took no accountability for her actions.

I look forward to the next episode. More importantly, I look forward to seeing flashbacks of Nova’s childhood including her and Ernest’s father-daughter dynamic, mother-daughter dynamic, the day Ernest and True ended their relationship and the day he left St. Josephine. Maybe “it will all make sense,” as Nova says.

Until next time, let me know your thoughts below.

Author: BellaDour

Writer. Screenwriter. Poet. I write about personal development, self-care and adulting

2 thoughts on “Queen Sugar: No Longer Imagine”

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